Category Archives: reviews

Heavy Metal Mothership out now on Heavy Psych Sounds

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As I reported back in July, I’ve been handling bass for SF heavy psych metal band Turn Me On Dead Man, who recently signed to Heavy Psych Sounds out of Italy. Since then the album has been pressed up and is ready to ship! There are black and transparent splatter available. Purchase links are HERE and check out this stellar review via The Obelisk.

 

 

Also in the works is a European tour that is slated to kick off in Feb 2018, more details as that develops.

My first show with these guy will be November 17th at Coopers in Nevada City.

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One final bit of business to announce here is our Patreon campaign. In order to keep up on gear maintenance, rehearsal rent, transportation and other incidental things that keep a band afloat, we need to solicit the help of our friends, fans and family. We hate to do it but the days of major labels floating developing artists with bloated budgets are long over, we do this on our own and with the support of an Independent label. That being said, independent labels like Heavy Psych are essential to our growth, and they facilitate our being able to gain exposure in different markets, but they are not backed by major label money, and we still have to support a lot of what we do in the day to day of the band. Check out the Patreon and pitch in if you can, there will be exclusive content and future offers on merch etc. for patrons of our campaign. You will be rewarded!

TURN ME ON DEAD MAN ON PATREON

Cover Photo by Sven Wiederholt with further manipulation by Jonesy Daysleeper

 


 

 

 

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Outsound New Music Summit: Touch the Gear 2017

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Tom Djil

I was invited to show a few pieces from my set up at Touch the Gear this year. This was part of the Outsound New Music Summit 2017

There were modular rigs as well as custom instruments, though I suppose the nature of modular is also largely customizable. Specifically, outside there were acoustic instruments presented by Pet the Tiger. They had a pretty sizable Kalimba and this giant set up (a metallophone) with metallic plates and a lovely low tone produced by the largest plate. We had an impromptu jam on that and I sampled a bit of it for fun, maybe I’ll use some in a future collage.

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Pet the Tiger

There was some visual stuff

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Tim Thompson

Modular

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Amanda Chaudhary

I brought a few things including a Mother 32, Moogerfooger MF104M Delay, Tascam 414 cassette 4 track, ipad with various sound apps. Easily the most popular item was the Monoscillatron which I’ve posted about before on Youtube

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Alphastare

By total coincidence my friends at Wondersound Industries just released The Monoscillatron for purchase at Reverb.com with a special that runs from today July 28th until July 31st!

Hear it in action in the video below, as well as a few other sounds from my table. I also did a brief walkthrough. For more coverage visit Catsynth 

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PJ Harvey At The Masonic SF

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Just the other day I was talking with my wife about certain aspects of the old music scene we experienced in our youth (circa late 80’s-early 90’s) she on the West Coast (LA area) and me in Buffalo in the heart of the East Coast Hardcore scene. Growing up in LA she got to experience some of the best years of the LA punk scene as it was then and I also got to catch some of the tail end of the early HC scene on the East Coast just as it was becoming overrun with jocks and squares curious about all the energy and noise and tattoos and the punks with the funny colored hair etc. I came across this cd at work the other day and it just illustrates the time perfectly (1993) 2 years after The Year that Punk Broke 

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This was from a Biohazard cd and it was one of the bands we had just been talking about. I remember when every show I went to after a certain period was dominated by these line-ups of aggro, testosterone driven muscle guys with guitars. I was 18-19 at the time and it was glaringly obvious that there was very little room for girls in this scene and that was a drag. The Riot Girl movement was underway by then but that was also an aggro and exclusive sort of subscene that didn’t fully encompass or embrace all women in indy/punk or the Hardcore movement unless they were openly a part of it. Spitboy  were a perfect example of this.

Anyway, I remember being pretty disillusioned around this time about all of it, by 1993 I had pretty much stopped going to shows for fear of being beat up by Nazi’s who by then had infltrated much of the scene and mostly went to shows to start shit. A while before this time I started sneaking into the 21 and over ‘New Wave and Goth-Industrial’ club and experiencing different more interesting music and a much more gender balanced world where I could meet and socialize with girls for once! This was also a more mature scene without all of the BS of the all ages shows. The shock value of the punk stuff by then had worn out and the homogenization of alternative ‘culture’ had begun, so to get into bands with names like Christian Death and Alien Sex Fiend was quite appealing as it put off even the most outwardly ‘alternative’ people around at the time…

I remember one day driving around with a good friend when he popped in a mixtape, one of the things we loved most was driving around listening to cleverly curated tapes made from our recent record purchases. At some point he goes ‘check this out’ and 50 Ft Queenie comes on the car stereo and in my mind put a stake in the heart of the male dominated alternative music world as it was in 93′. It was fast and aggressive and lo-fi but still somehow feminine and sexy and if it wasn’t on Island would have been an indie staple. Either way, for a track like that to make it above ground added much needed color to the sterile post-Nirvanabe era of music saturating the college radio stations at the time. It was, for me, a much needed salve for the previous few years of my disappointment in the scene. PJ was weird and interesting and wrote short catchy songs with odd arrangements that stuck in your head, she was embraced by a wide array of people, even if it took some time.

24 years after initially hearing that song I finally got to see her live with my wife. Her set was mostly new material which I haven’t fully explored yet, so it was pleasant but unfamiliar. She had a very full band including Mick Harvey (The Bad Seeds) 2 drummers and there was quite a bit of instrument switching as everyone up there was a multi-instrumentalist of some sort. The sound at The newly remodeled Masonic in SF was excellent and we were in the balcony as opposed to the floor which was where we saw Diamanda Galas from a few weeks prior (she also sounded great!). We enjoyed the new stuff but she really made it worth it by playing ’50 Ft. Queenie’ ‘To Bring You My Love’ and my wife’s fave “Down By the Water”.

Enjoy!


SF Zinefest 2016

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Many of you old fart punk rockers out there will remember the days of cut-n-paste collaging in order to create an eye catching and status quo challenging advert for your old band’s basement gigs. Usually containing crude imagery, shocking content in black and white with ‘ransom note’ style text cobbled together from various sources. Many of you will also remember the next level DIY collaged zines that were painstakingly assembled late at night in a 24 hour Kinkos that your buddy worked at…

The content usually involved coverage of a regional or more accurately, ‘micro-regional’ underground music and/or art scene, covering shows and events with occasional short fiction or comics and music reviews. They were xeroxed and collated and stapled manually upon completion and subsequently given away to anyone remotely interested. Seldom did they charge for these. If anything, 25cts or a trade sufficed.

A lot of these ‘rags’ also travelled to other micro-regions via snail mail and this was before the internetz, so this was a lifeline for people seeking out new and exciting happenings in places other than their own. It went hand in hand with the burgeoning DIY music scene as this was also how bands contacted each other as well as venues to put together tours and find places to stay while out on the road, especially in smaller areas off the beaten path where folks didn’t have access to a big city to see shows of any level. Black Flag is a good example of a band that mastered this and in fact blazed a trail that is still used by bands today. Check out Spray Paint the Walls for a more detailed read about how they did it.

These were really small run, handmade and practically ephemeral which makes zines an interesting literary niche that is still going strong to this day.

THE EVOLUTION OF THE ZINE

Some zines that I know from back in the day started out as crudely xeroxed and stapled handmade affairs but eventually evolved into full-on mags with excellent content and credibility. A couple of examples that come to mind are Ugly Things run by Mike Stax out of San Diego Ca. who’s focus is 60’s garage and psych music. His staying power is a result of really thorough sourcing and in depth coverage of really obscure bands. He is really good at finding surviving members of these long forgotten groups and interviewing them at length which usually reveals some fun and interesting behind the scenes happenings we would never hear about anywhere else.

Early Ugly Thing’s (circa early 80’s)

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UT #2 (1983)

 

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Ugly Things #9 (1990)

Current Ugly Things

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Ugly Things #42 (2016)

The Big Takeover

Also very in depth with lengthy articles to get lost in…as you see the early issues were very text heavy.

Early Big Takeovers (circa early 80’s)

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The Big Takeover Vol 1, issue #5 (1981)

 

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The Big Takeover issue 9 (1983)

Recent Big Takeover

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The Big Takeover issue #77 (2015)

 

Another example that I hold close is Bomp magazine created and maintained by Greg Shaw who started making zines by hand as early as 1966 with Mojo Navigator, an inspiration for Rolling Stone Magazine. He made Tolkien related mimeographed zines in the 60’s also, a very early representation of zines not music focused. His real legacy though lies in Who Put the Bomp which I’ve mentioned before as one of my old record store bosses Gary Apollo, who recently passed away also worked with Greg for a few years in LA on the magazine. Even the infamous ‘Powerpop Issue’ which looked really polished and professional was all done by hand! Cut-paste for days…

Early Bomp (circa 1971)

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Who Put The Bomp (Jan 1971)

1978 issue

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Bomp ‘Powerpop Issue’ (1978)

 


I had just read this article the day before in the New York Times: “No, the Internet Has Not Killed the Printed Book, Most People Still Prefer Them”  and on our way to the event there were 2 separate people sitting across from us reading books, so as far as I can see, books and printed media are still important to people and if you think otherwise, you’re sadly mistaken and likely missing out on a lot of information you will not find online. It’s also similar to the Record experience in music, the desire to hold something in your hands crafted by artists through painstaking processes to create something significant and tangible which helps drive the experience deeper into your psyche…

This was further driven home when we entered the festival and saw how many people turned out to look at and buy these mostly tiny handmade mags! There were artists, musicians, printmakers, poets and authors, lefties, activists and anarchists and a wide array of items to be had. In addition to xeroxed zines, self published books and underground comics were t-shirts, posters, bags, buttons, some musicians had small run cds, cassettes and even vinyl all DIY and small runs. There were too many artists to mention but I’ve included links where possible and SF Zinefest has it’s own site at sfzinefest.org as well as an instagram and twitter where you can explore and discover a large group of artists both young and not so young! There were some OG’s in the house which leads me into some pics from the event.

RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS

First I had to catch up with V.Vale of REsearch Publicatons who is known for his zine Search and Destroy going back to 1977 and his Industrial Culture Handbook and coverage of all things weird and subversive under the REsearch imprint. I purchased this collated, unfolded printing of ‘A Visit From Monte Cazazza’ which I look forward to devouring.

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Yours Truly with V.Vale and Monte C.
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The REsearch Table

PM PRESS

PM Press had a table. The previously mentioned Black flag  book Spray Paint The Walls can be obtained through them as well as some other important punk lit.

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PM Press

SPITBOY RULE

It was really cool to meet Michelle Cruz Gonzales from the SF all girl band Spitboy who were around from 1990-95. We grabbed her book Spitboy Rule  also available through PM Press, but it was nice to be able to get one directly from her and she signed it. This will be a welcome read next to our recently obtained copy of Alice Bags book Violence Girl as these are the voices of xicana women from the old school punk scene, there were very few!

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Michelle Gonzales and Monica

TEAM PRINT SHOP

I also ran into an old friend who worked for a t-shirt print shop I also worked at for awhile in Oakland. He’s since broken off and started his own thing called Team Print Shop

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Team Print Shop
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Team Print Shop

UNITY PRESS

Pretty randomly, I walked past this one table and had to stop because I recognized the curious artwork on the t-shirts first, then the table also had zines with these similar cartoon-like characters in weird homoerotic poses I remembered from some show posters I grabbed from the bulletin board at my band’s rehearsal studio (images below) they were posters for a show that had already passed, so I wasn’t hindering the band’s progress!

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Found Art 1
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Found Art 2

Turns out these guys rehearse down the hall from us in Oakland and the band is a bit of an artist collective that release zines under Unity Press and the creator of these weird ass images are by the artist Jeffrey Cheung.

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Jeffrey Cheung (Left)

I was also stoked to hear they recorded their debut record in their studio on a 4 track and released to vinyl via the Oakland based label Digital Regress. The DIY ethic instantly endeared them to me and we also have the same name…Jeff’s Rule!

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Jeff signing the poster for my record

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I gave the album a whirl and it’s really good for a 4 track recording! The style is very 90’s indie rock but without the pretentiousness of a lot of that stuff and it also lacked the noisy angst ridden aspect that turns me off to so many of those bands. There are some nice melodies here and simple arrangements and nicely played!

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“Thanks Jeff for the support, glad you took the fliers! Jeff”

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This table caught my eye also but we were on our way out, so I didn’t get a chance to say hi, but here’s a shout out to Bagger43 they had some nice looking stuff and I dug their aesthetic.

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Bagger43

 

EVENT PICS

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This guy was working during the event!

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There were 2 rooms full of tables and plenty of people milling around!

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We walked out of the event quite sated and it was great to see so many people out there just to celebrate the printed word, and of course to support art and artists operating on their own terms! Get off the internet and go read a book now! We came home with plenty of stuff to read and enjoy!

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‘The Booty’

All pics by Jeff K. 2016 (except Bomp, Big Takeover and Ugly Things covers)